Mission

Concerned Citizens for Nuclear Safety

Our mission is to protect all living beings and the environment from the effects of radioactive and other hazardous materials now and in the future.

107 Cienega Street
Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501

Telephone: (505) 986-1973
Fax: (505) 986-0997
Email: ccns@nuclearactive.org

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Current Activities

WIPP Recovery Information to be Released Next Week

CCNS NEWS UPDATE

Runs 9/12/14 through 9/19/14

(THEME UP AND UNDER) This is the CCNS News Update, an overview of the latest nuclear safety issues, brought to you every week by Concerned Citizens for Nuclear Safety. Here is this week’s top headline:

* WIPP Recovery Information to be Released Next Week

Information about the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) recovery plans will be released next week at a New Mexico Legislative Committee Meeting on Tuesday, September 16th and at the WIPP Town Hall on Thursday, September 18th, both of which will be held in Carlsbad, New Mexico. It is anticipated recovery would take at least two years following the February 14th release of plutonium and americium from at least one waste container shipped by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) that exploded in the underground dump for nuclear bomb waste.

On Tuesday, September 16th, the interim Radioactive and Hazardous Materials Committee of the New Mexico Legislature will meet at the Western Commerce Bank Community Room, located at 3010 National Parks Highway in Carlsbad, from 10 am to 5 pm.  http://www.nmlegis.gov/lcs/committee_detail.aspx?CommitteeCode=RHMC  In the morning, presentations will be made by Dana Bryson, the Department of Energy (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office Deputy Manager, about the status of WIPP, and by Terry Wallace, the LANL Principal Associate Director for Global Security, about the status of LANL.

In the afternoon, presentations will be made by Don Hancock, of Southwest Research and Information Center, about the environmental response; by Russell Hardy, Director of the Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring and Research Center, New Mexico State University, about the WIPP monitoring; and by Ryan Flynn, Secretary of the state Environment Department, and their consultant, Dr. Ines Triay, about the Environment Department response. Dr. Triay is the former manager of WIPP.

In recent weeks Environment Department Secretary Flynn has expressed frustration with DOE because they have not provided all of the requested information. As a regulator of WIPP and LANL, the Environment Department can impose fines and penalties on both sites. Flynn said that DOE has been muzzling scientists who possess critical information.

On Thursday, September 18th at 5:30 pm MST, the DOE will discuss its WIPP recovery activities, but not release the Recovery Plan, during the bimonthly town hall meeting at the Carlsbad City Hall. It will be webcast at http://new.livestream.com/rrv

The Recovery Plan has been under review by DOE Headquarters for months. Some recovery activities have already taken place, including radiological surveys of the mine floor and putting the waste hoist back into service. Recently, workers began preparations to resume maintenance work on the rock bolts used to hold the ceiling in place, but first they are doing maintenance on the equipment needed to do the work.

Don Hancock, of Southwest Research and Information Center, said, “The WIPP underground cannot be completely decontaminated. The Recovery Plan should describe what DOE deems acceptable levels of cleanup and worker exposure. It should also provide realistic costs and schedules for the proposed activities and be subject to public review.”  http://www.sric.org

 

This has been the CCNS News Update. To learn more, please visit our website at http://www.nuclearactive.org.

 

Eighteenth Annual Gathering for Mother Earth to be Held September 27th and September 28th in Pojoaque

2014 Gathering for Mother Earth flyer

2014 Gathering for Mother Earth flyer

CCNS NEWS UPDATE
Runs 9/5/14 through 9/12/14

(THEME UP AND UNDER)  This is the CCNS News Update, an overview of the latest nuclear safety issues, brought to you every week by Concerned Citizens for Nuclear Safety.  Here is this week’s top headline:

*   Eighteenth Annual Gathering for Mother Earth to be Held September 27th and September 28th in Pojoaque

The eighteenth annual Gathering for Mother Earth, sponsored by Tewa Women United, is scheduled for Saturday and Sunday, September 27th and 28th, in Pojoaque. The event, which is open to the public of all cultures of all ages, seeks to honor Mother Earth for her lifegivingness.  The Gathering is a time for community unity to protect the most vulnerable people, including pregnant women, infants and farmers, especially those living around production sites for nuclear weapons.  http://tewawomenunited.org/

Both days will begin with a sunrise service at 6:30 am.  Saturday’s scheduled program will begin around 9 am and include mini-gathering circles and workshops, ending around 5 p.m.  Local Native dancer groups and others will perform, including Jon Naranjo’s Family Dancers, The Danza Mexika Dancers, Indigie Femme and others, Beverly Doxtator of Native Lifeways, Inc., and Katia Delgado and others from Peru who will grace attendees with their spiritual wisdom.

A delicious communal meal will be provided, followed by entertainment by local poets from 100,000 Poets for Change.

The Sunday sunrise service will include a blessing for the relay runners participating in the Sacred Relay Run.  At 7:30 am, the runners will begin the run at Tsankawi, the ancestral Pueblo homelands near Los Alamos, and end at the Gathering site.

At 10 am there will be Memorials for Beloved Elders and Youth Leader.  Tributes will be given for the Late Beloved Vincent Harding and Late Elder Johnson Bluehorse.  A Tribute for Youthful Loss will be given for Victor Villalpando, the 16-year old El Rito youth shot and killed by an Espanola police officer in June.

The Gathering will close around 1 pm when there will be a traditional distribution of gifts.

Kathy Sanchez, of Tewa Women United and organizer of the Gathering, said, “Let us all celebrate cultural ways of sharing love and gratitude for our Earth Mother — to show love for her will heal our hearts of grief and overwhelming sense of loss we feel as violence pressures us to be numb and do violence to ourselves and others.  It is time to unite for eco-systemic revival.”

She added, “The emphasis of the Gathering is on healing Mother Earth to bring sacredness back into our homes of earth-based living.  We need to encourage all cultures, all ages, schools, communities and families to bring intergenerational thinking to holistic ways of active healing.”

The Gathering will be held at Pojoaque Ben’s Gathering Grounds on Highway 502, 1.8 miles west of the interchange with Highways 285 and 84, near the Pojoaque High School.  Please bring your own dishes and water bottle.  To volunteer, please call (505) 747-3259.

This has been the CCNS News Update.  To learn more, please visit our website at www.nuclearactive.org.

 

Join the Nuclear-Free, Carbon-Free Contingent at the September 21st People’s Climate March in New York City

 

CCNS NEWS UPDATE
Runs 8/29/14 through 9/5/14

(THEME UP AND UNDER)  This is the CCNS News Update, an overview of the latest nuclear safety issues, brought to you every week by Concerned Citizens for Nuclear Safety.  Here is this week’s top headline:

*  Join the Nuclear-Free, Carbon-Free Contingent at the September 21st People’s Climate March in New York City

On September 21, 2014, the Nuclear-Free, Carbon-Free Contingent will join the historic People’s Climate March in New York City to demand immediate action from all of the governments of the world to slash climate-changing emissions in all sectors of society.  They say that nuclear power cannot solve the climate crisis and that its continued use exacerbates the problem by preventing the deployment of clean energy systems.  Their slogan is “No Nukes, No Coal, No Kidding!  Don’t Nuke the Climate!”

The Nuclear Information and Resource Service, based in Takoma Park, Maryland, is taking the lead for the Contingent.  They say that a nuclear-free, carbon-free energy system is a necessity and define it as a “system that relies not on antiquated energy models of the 20th century and their polluting nuclear power and fossil fuel technologies, but on a safe, clean, affordable and sustainable renewable energy, energy efficiency, and modern grid technologies of the 21st century.”

They argue that nuclear power is too dangerous, too dirty, too expensive and too slow.  It is too dangerous because expanded use would inevitably lead to more Fukushimas and Chernobyls.  New designs for nuclear reactors exist only on paper and cannot be brought to the commercial marketplace in time to have a meaningful impact on climate change.  Further, the technology and materials needed to generate nuclear energy can be diverted to nuclear weapons programs.

Nuclear power is too dirty because the nuclear fuel chain produces vast amounts of lethal radioactive and toxic waste.  The nuclear fuel chain is responsible for far more carbon emissions than renewable energy generation and improved energy efficiency.

Nuclear power is the most expensive means possible for reducing carbon and methane emissions.  Its use crowds out investment in clean energy sources.

Construction of nuclear power plants would require an unprecedented nuclear construction program, which would be beyond the capability of the world’s manufacturers within an acceptable time frame.

The Contingent argues that “clean energy, including solar, wind, appropriately-sited geothermal, increased energy efficiency, distributed generation, electricity storage and other advanced technologies, can meet the world’s electricity needs without radiation releases, carbon and methane emissions and other pollutants.  All that is lacking is the political will to rapidly deploy these clean technologies.”

You are cordially invited to be part of the largest, most visible outpouring of public support ever for immediate action on the climate crisis and against nuclear power as a counterproductive climate solution.  Michael Marriott, of the Nuclear Information and Resource Service, wrote that the March “can be the largest anti-nuclear power outpouring in decades-but that depends on you.”  For more information, please visit nirs.org.

This has been the CCNS News Update.  For more information, please visit nuclearactive.org and like us on Facebook.

 

 

WIPP Worker Harmed by Vehicle Fire Sues Operators for Negligence

 

CCNS NEWS UPDATE
Runs 8/22/14 through 8/29/14


(THEME UP AND UNDER)  This is the CCNS News Update, an overview of the latest nuclear safety issues, brought to you every week by Concerned Citizens for Nuclear Safety.  Here is this week’s top headline:

* WIPP Worker Harmed by Vehicle Fire Sues Operators for Negligence

William Utter, a waste handler at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), and his family filed a personal injury lawsuit in the New Mexico District Court in Santa Fe against the current and former contractors for injuries sustained when the salt hauling truck caught fire on February 5, 2014.   Utter continues to suffer from smoke inhalation and other injuries.  The family is suing Southwest Safety Specialists, Inc., a company charged with maintaining the fire suppression system; Nuclear Waste Partnership, LLC, the current operating contractor; Washington TRU Solutions, LLC, the previous operating contractor; and URS Energy and Construction, the lead partner operating contractor; for personal injury, negligence, premises liability, intentional and willful conduct, loss of consortium, damages, and punitive damages.  The Utters are asking for a six-person jury trial.  Utter v. Southwest Safety Specialists, Inc., Nuclear Waste Partnership, LLC, Washington TRU Solutions, LLC, URS Energy & Construction, Inc.

Utter was in the underground mine when the salt hauling vehicle caught on fire.  He was among the 86 workers who were evacuated, some who had difficulty seeing the markers indicating the way to the elevator hoist to exit the mine located 2,150 feet below the surface.  Utter was one of the 13 workers who were treated for smoke inhalation.  He continues to be treated by respiratory specialists in Albuquerque and Denver.

The complaint relies upon the facts uncovered during the internal Department of Energy (DOE) investigation by the Accident Investigation Board.  http://energy.gov/em/articles/doe-finalizes-wipp-fire-investigation-report  It found that the underground mine fire was entirely preventable and that the DOE and its WIPP contractors created dangerous conditions for the workers.

The salt hauling truck is nearly 30 years old.  In 2003, Southwest Safety Specialists removed the automatic fire suppression system from the truck and installed a manual fire suppression system, which failed to perform properly.  In 2005, there was another fire involving this vehicle, caused by an electrical short.  Nevertheless, the contractors did not reinstall the automatic fire suppression system.

On February 5th, the truck operator tried to use the manual fire suppression system and a portable fire extinguisher, which both failed.  As a result, the fire created and spread extensive smoke, soot, toxins, and other dangerous airborne particulates and chemicals in the underground.  Further, the evacuation alarm was not adequate, the public address system did not work properly, and the contractors switched the air system from ventilation to filtration, contrary to standard mine safety requirements.  DOE and its contractors did not adequately train the workers for underground fires and some workers struggled with using the self-rescue respiratory masks.

Nuclear Waste Partnership became the operating contractor in October 2012 for a five-year contract term, with a five-year extension option through September 30, 2022.  The possible value of the 10-year contract exceeds $1.3 billion.

This has been the CCNS News Update.  For more information, please visit http://www.nuclearactive.org and like us on Facebook. 

 

 

New Mexicans Attend the Compliance Review of the United States by the United Nations Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination in Geneva

 

CCNS NEWS UPDATE
Runs 8/15/14 through 8/22/14

(THEME UP AND UNDER)  This is the CCNS News Update, an overview of the latest nuclear safety issues, brought to you every week by Concerned Citizens for Nuclear Safety.  Here is this week’s top headline:

*  New Mexicans Attend the Compliance Review of the United States by the United Nations Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination in Geneva

This week delegations from around the world and New Mexico presented to the United Nations Committee on the Elimination on Racial Discrimination (CERD) during their review of treaty compliance by the United States.  The CERD is an 18-member UN Treaty body that monitors compliance with the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination.  Over 175 State Parties ratified the Treaty.  The U.S. ratified it in 1994 and is bound by all provisions of the Treaty.  The Committee received alternative information from New Mexicans, including representatives from the South West Organizing Project (SWOP), http://www.swop.net/, and the Multicultural Alliance for a Safe Environment (MASE), http://masecoalition.org/, which directly challenged the U.S. assessment of its compliance.

In June 2013, the U.S. submitted a compliance report to the CERD.  In June of this year, Albuquerque-based SWOP, and MASE, a network of organizations based in the Grants uranium belt, submitted alternative or shadow reports to the Committee.

The MASE shadow report addressed uranium mining and milling wastes that, after more than 30 years, still have not been remediated in Milan, Church Rock, and throughout northwestern New Mexico.  The unremediated wastes keep contaminating the air, land and water, while at the same time the U.S. government and state governments continue to permit new uranium mines.  The impacts from both historic waste and new mining fall primarily on Indigenous communities.

The SWOP report outlines the unequal implementation and enforcement of air pollution laws in Albuquerque and Bernalillo County by local regulatory agencies and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).  Local laws effectively segregate low-income and minority populations into neighborhoods that face high pollution and high health risks.  For example, community efforts to sample the air in the San Jose neighborhood revealed that concentrations of the volatile organic compound chlorobenzene are 10 times higher than concentrations typically found in urban ambient air and are above the reference concentrations of the EPA.  Chlorobenzene is a solvent and long-term exposure of humans affects the central nervous system.  In the Mountain View neighborhood, there are more cases of lung, bladder, and brain cancer and leukemia than statistically expected.  These neighborhoods do not have adequate means to seek redress from their unequal treatment under the current interpretation of federal environmental and civil rights laws.

After the review process, CERD will publish its Concluding Observations, which include recommendations for actions the U.S. should take to fulfill its commitment under the treaty to eliminate racial discrimination in its policies and practices.  The CERD Concluding Observations along with the Alternative Reports are available online: http://www2.ohchr.org/english/bodies/cerd/.

This has been the CCNS News Update.  For more information, please visit http://www.nuclearactive.org and like us on Facebook.

 

 

DOE Secretary Moniz to Visit New Mexico Early Next Week

CCNS NEWS UPDATE

Runs 8/8/14 through 8/15/14

(THEME UP AND UNDER) This is the CCNS News Update, an overview of the latest nuclear safety issues, brought to you every week by Concerned Citizens for Nuclear Safety. Here is this week’s top headline:

  • DOE Secretary Moniz to Visit New Mexico Early Next Week

On Monday, Ernest Moniz, the Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary, will be in New Mexico to meet with elected officials and regulators, make opening remarks at a public meeting about energy in Santa Fe and hold a public town hall in Carlsbad about the fire and radiation release that occurred in February at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). On Tuesday, he will visit WIPP. http://www.wipp.energy.gov/wipprecovery/recovery.html

On Monday, August 11th, Secretary Moniz will attend a Quadrennial Energy Review meeting in Santa Fe. The Quadrennial Energy Review, which was launched by the Obama administration in January, is a broad effort to provide recommendations about the key infrastructure needed for the transmission, distribution and storage of energy. Interior Secretary Sally Jewell and Senator Martin Heinrich will participate in the meeting, which will focus on tribal, state and local issues. It will take place at the New Mexico State Personnel Office, located at 2600 Cerrillos Road, in Santa Fe, beginning at 9 am.  http://energy.gov/articles/secretary-moniz-announces-travel-chicago-north-dakota-new-mexico-quadrennial-energy-review

Also on Monday, Secretary Moniz will host a town hall meeting at the Leo Sweet Community Center, located at 1302 Mission Avenue, in Carlsbad, beginning at 6:30 pm. The town hall will be livestreamed at new.livestream.com/rrv  The focus will be on the recovery efforts at WIPP following the truck fire on February 5th and the radiation release on February 14th. Plutonium and americium was detected in air filters located one-half mile away from the WIPP exhaust shaft. Twenty-two workers were exposed to the radiation.

Photographs have shown a waste drum from Los Alamos National Laboratory released radioactivity in the WIPP underground. Further investigations will take place in the coming weeks to try to determine if other containers also are breached. The cause of the release is still not known, so whether additional releases might occur in the future also is unknown.

DOE is developing a plan to detail what activities it will undertake in order to decontaminate the underground and resume waste disposal operations. The plan also is supposed to provide cost estimates and schedules for those activities. The plan has not been made public, but may be a subject of discussion during Secretary Moniz’s visit.

WIPP is the federal government’s only site for the permanent disposal of nuclear and hazardous waste generated by the research, development and manufacture of nuclear weapons and is located 2,150 feet below land surface in a salt formation located 26 miles east of Carlsbad.  http://www.wipp.energy.gov/index.htm

Ryan Flynn, the Secretary of the New Mexico Environment Department, will attend the events in Carlsbad. Flynn said he is interested in learning about how DOE will provide improved oversight of nuclear safety, emergency management and mine safety at the WIPP site.  http://www.nmenv.state.nm.us/

 

This has been the CCNS News Update. For more information, please visit nuclearactive.org and like us on Facebook.

 

Trinity Site Atomic Bomb Test Commemoration in Tularosa

 

 

CCNS NEWS UPDATE

Runs 8/1/14 through 8/8/14

(THEME UP AND UNDER) This is the CCNS News Update, an overview of the latest nuclear safety issues, brought to you every week by Concerned Citizens for Nuclear Safety. Here is this week’s top headline:

  • Trinity Site Atomic Bomb Test Commemoration in Tularosa

About 70 people attended the Fifth Annual Luminaria Lighting and Prayer Vigil in Tularosa, New Mexico, on Saturday, July 26th in commemoration of the Trinity Site Atomic Bomb Test. Trinity was the site of the first experimental test of the atomic bomb on July 16, 1945, at what is now known as the White Sands Missile Range. It led to the U.S. bombing of Hiroshima, Japan on August 6th of that same year.

The Tularosa Basin Downwinders Consortium, in cooperation with the Village of Tularosa, organized the public event at the Tularosa Little League Field. More than 150 luminarias were lit in memory of those who lost their lives to cancer and other radiation related illnesses directly linked to the test explosion. At least half of the people in attendance were cancer survivors and those living with cancer.

One lone luminaria was placed in the center of the field in honor of Fred Tyler, co-founder of the Tularosa Basin Downwinders Consortium. Tyler died earlier this year of a lung disease.

The Consortium formed in order to ensure that those exposed to the test be covered by the federal Radiation Exposure Compensation Act (RECA), which has provided compensation for other impacted communities downwind of the Nevada Test Site and the Marshall Islanders for over 20 years. New Mexico Senator Tom Udall has led the effort to introduce amendments to RECA that would include the Trinity downwinder.

Senator Udall’s Senate speech acknowledging the work of the Consortium in support of expansion of RECA was played at the event. Udall said, “The original RECA bill required years of work on the ground. My father, [Stewart Udall], helped lay the groundwork for RECA a quarter century ago through his work with radiation exposure survivors and their families, compiling stories, records and histories of victims. The Tularosa Basin Downwinders Consortium continues this critical work, and I encourage them to keep up the fight. This is a bipartisan effort and driven by simple fairness for American citizens who should have been helped, but were ignored instead.”    http://www.tomudall.senate.gov/?p=press_release&id=1719

Concerning the memorial event, Tina Cordova, a co-founder of the Consortium, said, “Every time I see all the luminarias with names and learn of another person who has passed I lament. Every time I learn of another neighbor stricken with cancer I am saddened. We will keep the vigil going until the time that our Congressional Representatives are present to lament with us and we receive the recognition of our suffering that we’ve waited 69 years for.”

For more information about the work of the Consortium, please contact Tina Cordova at 505-897-6787 or tcordova@queston.net

 

This has been the CCNS News Update. For more information, please visit our website at nuclearactive.org or our Facebook page.

 

Navajo Grassroots Organizations Celebrate Navajo Nation Council Vote Stopping Pro-Uranium Mining Legislation

CCNS NEWS UPDATE

Runs 7/25/14 through 8/1/14

(THEME UP AND UNDER) This is the CCNS News Update, an overview of the latest nuclear safety issues, brought to you every week by Concerned Citizens for Nuclear Safety. Here is this week’s top headline:

* Navajo Grassroots Organizations Celebrate Navajo Nation Council Vote Stopping Pro-Uranium Mining Legislation

This week the Navajo Nation Council’s Resources and Development Committee voted down a bill that would have opened up new uranium mining on lands adjacent to those of the Navajo Nation. In related action and in a vote of 18 to 3, the Navajo Nation Council approved a bill by Edmund Yazzie, a Council Delegate representing Churchrock, which provides for a more open and democratic process regarding uranium issues. The bill sets a precedent that all uranium-related bills must be heard before the full Council.

The votes fortify the Diné Natural Resources Protection Act, passed by the Navajo Nation Council in 2005, which placed a moratorium on all forms of uranium mining within Navajo Indian Country. A coalition of Navajo grassroots organizations opposed to uranium mining, called Concerned Diné Citizens, who worked together to defeat the bad legislation sponsored by former New Mexico State Senator and current Navajo Council Delegate Leonard Tsosie and supported Delegate Yazzie’s legislation securing community and ecological sovereignty.

For over two decades, Uranium Resources, Inc. (URI) has proposed to mine for uranium using an in-situ leaching methods in the Churchrock area. This proposition would contaminate the communities source of unspoiled drinking water derived from a below ground drinking water aquifer. In-situ uranium mining is similar to oil fracking, in that chemicals and large quantities of water are used to extract the uranium. In addition, radioactive radon is released into the air and heavy metals are mobilized through the leaching process.

Last year, the Churchrock Chapter passed a resolution that allowed URI to set up an in-situ leach uranium mining demonstration project on lands adjacent to the Navajo Nation in Churchrock. Over the years, there have been several attempts to limit the decision making processes around this project to fewer and fewer people. Thus, the vote on the Yazzie bill allows for more decision makers to be involved.

Uranium mining boomed in the 1950s and 1960s in the Grants uranium belt. The mines operated before the Clean Water Act was passed and before the Environmental Protection Agency was formed. Cleanup of the uranium mines and mills was required. Now, 137 of 259 of the known mines have no records of remediation, and Navajo families are living with the side effects.

Leona Morgan, an organizer for Diné No Nukes, said, “Now the Nation’s focus can go back to the over whelming needs for clean up, health studies, and water studies. In order for these controversial issues not to play out so divisively in the future, it is imperative that all people—not just Diné people—understand the scope and permanent effects of abandoned uranium mines.”

 

This has been the CCNS News Update. To support the work of CCNS, please make your tax-deductible contribution at http://www.nuclearactive.org.

 

Pax Christi New Mexico to Commemorate U.S. Bombing of Hiroshima on Saturday, August 2nd in Los Alamos

CCNS NEWS UPDATE

Runs 7/18/14 through 7/25/14

(THEME UP AND UNDER)  This is the CCNS News Update, an overview of the latest nuclear safety issues, brought to you every week by Concerned Citizens for Nuclear Safety.  Here is this week’s top headline:

  • Pax Christi New Mexico to Commemorate U.S. Bombing of Hiroshima on Saturday, August 2nd in Los Alamos

Pax Christi New Mexico will hold its annual Hiroshima Day Commemoration on Saturday, August 2nd, 2014 from 2 pm to 4 pm in Los Alamos, New Mexico.   Near the end of World War II, on August 6th, 1945, the U.S. bombed Hiroshima, Japan with a nuclear weapon.  It has been 69 years since that event.  Pax Christi New Mexico seeks the abolition of nuclear weapons.

From 2 to 4 pm on Saturday, August 2nd, the Sackcloth and Ashes Prayer Vigil for Peace will be held at Ashley Pond in Los Alamos.  Please join Pax Christi New Mexico in the spirit of nonviolence to put on sackcloths and ashes and sit in silent meditation for 30 minutes to repent for the creation of nuclear weapons.  The sackcloth and ashes ceremony is taken from the Bible story found in the Book of Jonah.  In the story, God was angry about how the people of Nineveh were behaving and asked that they repent for their sins.  The people sat in sackcloths and on ashes and prayed for forgiveness.  God accepted their prayers and granted them peace.

Pax Christi will supply the sackcloths and ashes.  The action will end at Ashley Pond with closing remarks by Father John Dear.

Pax Christi New Mexico is a region of Pax Christi USA, the national Catholic peace movement, which seeks to promote the peace of Christ by exploring, articulating, witnessing and practicing Gospel nonviolence.   They work to abolish war, poverty, violence, injustice and nuclear weapons in New Mexico and the world and welcome God’s reign of peace on earth.  http://paxchristiusa.org/tag/pax-christi-new-mexico/

Bud Ryan, of Pax Christi New Mexico, said, “We in Pax Christi New Mexico ask you to join us for our annual Hiroshima Commemoration on Saturday, August 2nd.”

He continued, “For me this has been an incredible way to say I’m sorry for being part of the collective violence we in the U.S. perpetrate on others around the world, as well as ourselves.  Afterwards we ask you to join us to hear John Dear talk about nuclear weapons and what we can do to work to abolish them.  We would hope that for all participants this becomes a lifetime pursuit, rather than just a weekend, to rid the world of nuclear weapons and to get the nine nuclear weapon States to clean up their nuclear mess.”

Please join Pax Christi New Mexico at their inspiring, moving and important event.  For more information, please call Bud Ryan at 505 264-2838 or Ellie Voutselas at 505 474-8557.

    
This has been the CCNS News Update.  For more information, please visit our website at http://www.nuclearactive.org and like us on Facebook.

 

 

Trinity Site Atomic Bomb Test Commemoration Set for Saturday, July 26th

CCNS NEWS UPDATE

Runs 7/11/14 through 7/19/14

(THEME UP AND UNDER)  This is the CCNS News Update, an overview of the latest nuclear safety issues, brought to you every week by Concerned Citizens for Nuclear Safety.  Here is this week’s top headline:

  • Trinity Site Atomic Bomb Test Commemoration Set for Saturday, July 26th

The Fifth Annual Luminaria Lighting and Prayer Vigil will be held on Saturday, July 26th from 7 to 10 pm in Tularosa, New Mexico, in commemoration of the Trinity Site Atomic Bomb Test.  In its first experimental test, the atomic bomb was exploded near Tularosa on July 16, 1945.  This led to the U.S. bombing of Hiroshima, Japan on August 6th of that same year.  July 26, 2014 Trinity Event Flyer

The Tularosa Basin Downwinders Consortium, in cooperation with the Village of Tularosa, is organizing the public event, which will take place at the Tularosa Little League Field, off La Luz Avenue.  Luminarias will be available for a small donation beginning at 7 pm.  They will be lit in memory of those who have died from cancer and other illnesses related to exposure to the atomic bomb explosion.

The Consortium formed in order to be covered by the federal Radiation Exposure Compensation Act (RECA), which has provided other impacted communities downwind of the Nevada Test Site and for the Marshall Islanders with compensation.  New Mexico Senator Tom Udall has led the effort to introduce amendments to RECA that would include the Trinity downwinders, and others in New Mexico.

In support of the commemoration, Senator Udall recently took to the Senate floor to deliver a speech about the Consortium and the importance of their work to support amending RECA.  He said, “The original RECA bill required years of work on the ground. My father, [Stewart Udall], helped lay the groundwork for RECA a quarter century ago through his work with radiation exposure survivors and their families, compiling stories, records and histories of victims. The Tularosa Basin Downwinders Consortium continues this critical work, and I encourage them to keep up the fight.  This is a bipartisan effort and driven by simple fairness for American citizens who should have been helped, but were ignored instead.  …  It would also help post-1971 uranium workers to be eligible for compensation, and would fund a critical public health study of those who live and work in uranium development communities.”  http://www.tomudall.senate.gov/?p=new_media&type=videos&id=1703&#new_media_stage

Concerning the memorial event, Tina Cordova, a co-founder of the Consortium, said, “This year we will hold our fifth annual candlelight vigil in Tularosa to memorialize those who have lost their lives to cancer and other diseases associated with radiation exposure and honor those who have survived or are living with cancer.  It will be a bittersweet evening because we will be missing the co-founder of the Tularosa Basin Downwinders Consortium, Fred Tyler.  I know Fred would want us to keep up the fight so in his memory we carry on”.

For more information and opportunities to volunteer, please contact Tina Cordova at 505-897-6787.

 

This has been the CCNS News Update.  For more information, please visit our website at http://www.nuclearactive.org or our Facebook page.